Archive for August, 2009

Source: www.journalpatriot.com

Web%20model%20train%20layout

By: Mark Gabriel/staff photo

THE NEWLY COMPLETED “town” of Lakey Flats comes complete with railroad tracks as part of a complex model railroad display under construction by the Black Cat Club.
  
   Miniature railroad cars wind around hills, through tunnels and between tiny towns in a large HO model railroad display currently under construction by the Yadkin Valley Chapter of the National Railroad Historical Society, more commonly known as the Black Cat Railroad Club.

   The club is working on the final phase of the display, as they finish a model railroad station complete with turntable and a latticed network of switching tracks.

   “We’re all railroad nuts,” said club member Bob Fink about his fellow members’ passion for the project, currently under way at the club’s headquarters at the former Wilkes Art Gallery on Elizabeth Street in North Wilkesboro.
   “Some of us are just plain nuts,” said member Jim Davenport, laughing. “But that’s OK.”

   The model train display is built entirely in HO scale, the standard for model railroad trains. It comes with miniature buildings, cars and people in model towns called Plexico Junction, which has a power plant; Lakey Flats, which has its own fast food chicken restaurant; and Union Station, with its own central railway station.

   Along the way are model versions of motor vehicle crashes, logs tumbling off a railroad car, an apple orchard with bee gums nearby, and a moonshine still hidden behind some trees.

READ MORE

Stay Connected!
images  twitter_logo

Bookmark and Share

Advertisements

gfx

Source: Tricities.com

 By Joe Tennis
Features Writer / Bristol Herald Courier
Published: August 20, 2009

Roll into West Jefferson, N.C., and you wonder: What if? What if the old Virginia-Carolina Railway had not been broken up and lost in time?
What if this place looked more like the Old Dominion?
“If they had done it like they did in Virginia, with that bike trail, it would have been great,” said West Jefferson’s Calvin Green.
In Virginia, from Abingdon to Whitetop to the North Carolina border, this old railroad – later part of the Norfolk & Western line – has been preserved today as the Virginia Creeper Trail.
That logging line was once called the “Virginia Creeper Train.” And, at one time, it ran from Abingdon to West Jefferson, an Ashe County, N.C., town that boasts a bustling downtown district, including an arts scene with 13 murals on various buildings.
West Jefferson also has its own cheese factory. So … what if this train had become a trail here, too?
“My gut tells me it would have changed the dynamics of the community,” said Mike Everhart, the owner of Ashe County Cheese.
Today, you can still see parts of the old railroad bed in West Jefferson. Mysteriously, a cardboard sign nailed to a telephone pole says R/R – with no explanation – and points to the rail bed.
Yet, nearby, another sign marks this level, grassy area as “PRIVATE PROPERTY.”
Several yards from here, near the town’s new Backstreet Park, you can still see the old West Jefferson train depot, now used for storage by Green, 51, the owner of W.J. Hardware on the town’s Main Street.
Green bought the depot in the mid-1970s, just as the trains had quit running on the line. Once painted white with green trim, like so many other depots, it is now bright red.

READ MORE

images  twitter_logo

Bookmark and Share

article_156554_large

Source: Chattanoogan.com

The N.C. Transportation Museum Foundation and the Watauga Valley Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society offer a chance to see the beautiful fall foliage, experience a great destination and enjoy the romance of riding the rails this fall. The museum is again hosting fall train excursions. In addition to our traditional Charlottesville, Va. day trip, the museum will also offer a day trip to Asheville N.C.

After hosting day trips through the 1990s, the museum revived rail excursions in 2007. The past two years have been sell-out crowds and satisfied passengers made those excursions a great success. The “Virginia Autumn Special” will travel to Charlottesville, Va., Oct. 31, while the “Blue Ridge Special” will travel to Asheville, Nov. 1. Each day’s trip will include spectacular views of fall foliage.

Departing Spencer at 7 a.m., Saturday’s “Virginia Autumn Special” will again offer a second passenger pick-up at the Greensboro Amtrak Station at 8 a.m., allowing those living in the Triad a more convenient boarding opportunity. Passing through the North Carolina cities of Thomasville, High Point and Reidsville, and the Virginia cities of Danville, Lynchburg and Oak Ridge, passengers will experience beautiful views of the Piedmont and rolling hills of the Carolinas and the western part of Central Virginia.

READ MORE

images  twitter_logo

Bookmark and Share

Bryson City 028

09/18/2009 – 09/20/2009

Three days of railroad fun!  Railroad enthusiasts and history buffs alike gather for three days of railroad fun!  Enjoy visiting equipment, motor car displays and musical performances.  Enjoy a 7th Annual Mountain Craft Fair featuring handmade crafts, pottery & artwork from regional artists.  If you are interested in joining the craft fair download a pdf Application & Festival Policies.

Visit the Smoky Mountain Trains scenic model railroad museum in Bryson City.  Selected excursions now include admission to the museum.  Click here to learn more about Smoky Mountain Trains.

For more information on Great Smoky Mountains Railroad, visit: www.gsmr.com

images  twitter_logo

Bookmark and Share

Source: www.iberkshires.com

Picture1

By Phyllis McGuire
Special to iBerkshires

NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — Some boys never grow up, Brian A. Donelson freely admits when talking about his passion for trains and model railroads.

“It was in 1946 that I got a Lionel train for Christmas from my parents,” said Donelson. Asked if he still has that train, he replied, “Sure do!”

From his Shelburne Falls childhood, he “knew the ‘Hoot, Toot and Whistle Railroad,'” using the local nickname for the long-defunct Hoosac Tunnel and Wilmington Railroad.

Now 70, the railroad buff is hoping to share some of his love for trains with “The Coming of the Train,” the first in a two-volume set on the history and importance of rail in the region.

About 10 years ago, his concern that the history of the railroad was being forgotten sparked an interest in gathering information that he could share with historical societies — and anyone else who would appreciate the knowledge. As he became immersed in extensive research, however, the seeds of  “The Coming of the Train” was planted in his mind. 
 
“I wanted it to be more than a railroad book. In order to convey the importance of the Hoosac Tunnel and Wilmington Railroad, its impact on the industries and the people of the upper Deerfield River Valley needed to be understood,” Donelson writes in the book’s foreword.

READ MORE

Visit TarheelTrains.com!

images  twitter_logo

Bookmark and Share

nhv17059

Come experience the thrill of riding the rails – see, hear, and feel a part of railroad history.  The New Hope Valley Railway at the North Carolina Railroad Museum has operating days in season from May to December, with activities, themes, and events for visitors of all ages to enjoy.

Purchase train ride tickets for our scheduled operating days or you can charter group train rides, schedule operate-a-loco, or have a birthday party in a historic caboose.

The New Hope Valley Railroad (NHV) was organized in 1904 by W. Roscoe Bonsal, Samuel O. Bauersfeld, and Henry A. London.  Bonsal and Bauersfeld were originally from Baltimore, but came south to Hamlet, NC in 1895 as civil engineers to work on the railroads then building across the South.  London was from Pittsboro, NC, and among many other achievements in his life, owned or controlled the timber rights in the New Hope River Valley.  Bonsal had been very successful in the railroad business, and by 1898, was a vice president of the Seaboard System with an almost exclusive contract to supply ties for the expansion of that railroad.

For more information and to read more about the history, visit www.nhvry.org!

images  twitter_logo

Bookmark and Share