Posts Tagged ‘spencer’

Source: SalisburyPost.com

By Hugh Fisher

hfisher@salisburypost.com

SPENCER — Roy Johnson, president of the N.C. Transportation Museum Foundation, is looking ahead to a bright new year.

Under his leadership, the organization is making changes to protect itself, and is thriving despite a down economy.

“We’re trying to tell the full story of how transportation developed North Carolina,” he said.

The N.C. Transportation Museum Foundation provides fundraising and political advocacy for the 57-acre museum.

In particular, the foundation has helped acquire millions of dollars in historic artifacts for the museum.

Johnson, a Charlotte-based architect, has been president of the foundation since June.

Under his tenure, the museum has weathered continued fiscal belt-tightening by the state of North Carolina, and has seen visitors to the Spencer museum it supports increase by 15 percent.

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Source: Salisbury Post

By Hugh Fisher – hfisher@salisburypost.com

SPENCER — He’s making a list, and checking it twice, but not on a sleigh with snow and ice.

Santa Claus is taking the train to town.

With festive decorations aboard, the Santa Train’s been running at the N.C. Transportation Museum for the last two weekends.

Santa and his elves board to pass out treats and talk to each child and family.

“You kids stay sweet and smart,” Santa Claus said to Chloe and Cameron Mullinax of Mount Pleasant.

“Santa’s going to visit you real soon!”

Their mom, Christy Mullinax, has been bringing her daughters to Spencer for the Santa Train for years.

Chloe, who’s 3 years old this Christmas, smiled while one of the volunteers took her picture with Santa, her sister and her mom.

Cameron, who’s 7, had a long wish list ready for Santa:

“A DVD player that sits on your lap and a (Nintendo) DSi,” she said, among other things.

“You think he’s got enough time to get all that together?” Christy asked with a smile.

Cameron smiled and nodded. “He got my letter!”

Families from as far off as Shelby and Winston-Salem were among the riders sharing wishes with Santa yesterday afternoon.

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SantaTrainFeatherDecember 5-6, 12-13, 19-20

Tickets only available on the day of the event. Meet Santa Claus as he trades his sleigh for a locomotive! Take a 25-minute train ride with Santa and his elves, as Santa hands out oranges and candy canes, a Southern Railway tradition.

Children will hear classic Christmas tales and have fun making holiday ornaments in the Roundhouse.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO AND TO WATCH SANTA TRAIN VIDEO!SantaAndElfOnTrainFeather

$7 per person
Children who are 2 and under and will sit on a guardian’s lap for the
length of the train ride are free, and do not need a ticket to ride the train.
$5 for Firemen Level Members
$3.50 for Conductor Level Members

Free for Engineer Level Members

CLICK HERE to find our how to have cookies and cocoa with Santa!

Santa In The Roundhouse
 
 
 
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Boarding-the-train_w300Source: www.salisburypost.com

SPENCER, N.C. – More than 400 Boy Scouts will spend a busy and fun-filled weekend at the N.C. Transportation Museum during Rail Camp, Nov. 6-8. Troops will spend Friday through Sunday at the museum, the site of the former Spencer Shops steam locomotive repair facility.  

Most of the 28 troops attending this year’s Rail Camp come from North Carolina. However, troops will also be traveling from as far north as Danville, Va. and as far south as Anderson, S.C. All will learn about locomotive travel and rail transportation and earn their Railroading Merit Badge.  

Many troops and their leaders have been attending Rail Camp for several years. Dwight Creason, who leads Troop 525 from Mocksville, has attended for the past eight years. Creason’s says the scouts are able to learn a lot in a few days. “Most of them, even though they’ve read this stuff in the history books, they really don’t have a concept of it until its hands on,” he said. Creason credits the location, the former Spencer Shops, as making those lessons more tangible. “Being there on site where thousands of men worked several years ago, that’s a pretty awesome experience in itself.”

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Source: Salisbury Post

By Mark Wineka

SPENCER — Never go to the Family Rail Days Festival at the N.C. Transportation Museum without riding the rails.

Don and Anne Sebastian settled into an open-air passenger car Saturday and gave 4-year-old grandson Jacob a window seat.

“There’s a lot of history here, and a lot of people don’t realize how far back this goes,” Don said before the train rocked to a start.

Don Sebastian can’t help but be nostalgic when he visits the museum grounds, where Rail Days will continue from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today.

Thousands of men used to work here in the days when Spencer Shops served as Southern Railway’s major steam locomotive repair facility between Washington and Atlanta.

And one of those men was Sebastian’s father, Walter, who worked at least 40 years at the Roundhouse. Don grew up in Spencer, when the shops were central to everyone’s lives.

As the museum passenger train made its trip around the grounds Saturday, everything seemed to stir a memory for Sebastian.

At lunchtime, workers would play horseshoes on the hill next to the Master Mechanic’s office.

Over there, across the street from the Roundhouse, used to be the YMCA, which stayed open practically all night.

Southward, Don recalled how he and friends would make elaborate tunnels in the mountains of hay stored on the shops site. They did, that is, until railroad detectives caught them.

Their punishment — the worst thing of all — was that the detectives called their fathers.

In the steam engine days, Sebastian said, smoke and cinders blew all across town. Women in Spencer would time the hanging of their wash by how much smoke was in the air, Sebastian said.

He and Anne later had a home on Hudson Avenue. They bought the house next to them and eventually tore it down to salvage the wood.

Cinders from the steam engine days were accumulated in the house’s attic, Sebastian said.

You only learn these kinds of things riding a train.

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