Posts Tagged ‘tarheel trains’

logotransmThe North Raleigh Model Railroad Club (NRMRC) is the N Scale NTRAK model railroad club in North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park area, one of the best areas in the USA to live and work.

Founded in 1974, NRMRC members are dedicated to furthering the hobby of N-Scale model railroading through educational activities, community involvement and public displays. The Club models all railroads and welcomes new members, especially newcomers to the hobby. There is always plenty to do and learn, so come and join the fun. Check the Club’s News and Information page for meetings and the next train show in this area.

Visit: http://www.trainweb.org/nrmrc/index.html scenicridge

 
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Trains run Saturday Oct. 24 departing at 4:00PM, 5:15PM, 6:30PM, and 7:45PM with each ride taking about an hour.
Advance purchase of tickets is required.

Also – Fall Steam Spectacular!

Come ride behind two steam engines!  Enjoy a train ride behind our own Engine #17 and visiting Flagg Coal #75 through the beautiful New Hope Valley from Bonsal, NC.
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The New Hope Valley Railroad (NHV) was organized in 1904 by W. Roscoe Bonsal, Samuel O. Bauersfeld, and Henry A. London.  Bonsal and Bauersfeld were originally from Baltimore, but came south to Hamlet, NC in 1895 as civil engineers to work on the railroads then building across the South.  London was from Pittsboro, NC, and among many other achievements in his life, owned or controlled the timber rights in the New Hope River Valley.  Bonsal had been very successful in the railroad business, and by 1898, was a vice president of the Seaboard System with an almost exclusive contract to supply ties for the expansion of that railroad.

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For more information, please visit: http://www.nhvry.org 
 
 
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Two of the largest railroad festivals in NC are this weekend and next weekend.

Picture12 First, the establishment known as Tweetsie Railroad will host its annual Railfan Weekend this Saturday/Sunday, September 12th & 13th. Tweetsie breaks out #12 (Tweetsie) and also 190 (Yukon Queen) for a double-barrelled shotgun full of fun on their historic steam locomotives. For more, visit: www.Tweetsie.com!

And if that’s not enough…Great Smoky Mountains Railroad holds its annual Railfest on the following weekend. Friday/Saturday/Sunday, September 18th – 20th will be a three day gathering for railroad enthusiasts and history buffs from around the world provides an opportunity to ride special excursions, see railroad memorabilia and experience music of the rails. For more, visit www.GSMR.comgsmr-logo-2009

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Source: Salisbury Post

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SPENCER — The N.C. Transportation Museum dedicated new pieces of rail equipment, an exhibit honoring an essential part of railroading history and two new additions to the museum grounds as part of its 2009 Family Rail Days activities in June.

“It’s been an exceptional year, as we’re showing off a number of improvements at the museum,” said N.C. Transportation Museum Foundation President Roy Johnson.

The N.C. Ports Authority L-3, the N&W coal hopper No .59159, a Norfolk Southern signal bridge, the N.C. Lining Bar Gangs exhibit and the new West Lead railroad track were all dedicated. A pedestrian bridge on the museum grounds since 1996 was also rededicated following recent improvements.

The Ports Authority L-3 was built by General Electric in 1943. The 45-ton switcher was used by the Ports Authority in Wilmington its entire career to switch freight for shipment overseas. The authority also moved and loaded freight brought in by ship.

Donated by the state of North Carolina in 1980, the L-3 is one of the two oldest diesel locomotives at the museum. Following recent efforts and a $2,000 heritage grant from the National Railroad Historical Society, the L-3 has been restored to the condition in which it was used in the late 1970s.

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Visit: www.nctrans.org!

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