Posts Tagged ‘train rides’

Source: http://www.salisburypost.com

The Flagg 75 steam engine spits, coughs, breathes heavily and blows off a lot of steam before it finally moves.

In other words, I can relate.

I hopped into the cab of the 1930 workhorse locomotive Saturday morning as Engineer John Barnett of Raleigh backed it onto the roundtable at the N.C. Transportation Museum.

We took about a quarter turn before locking in and heading south on our warm-up run. The white steam we released made us a moving cloud at first.

On the right side of the cab, Barnett manned the throttle. Also within reach were the reverse gear, the locomotive and train brakes, injectors for water and even levers to release sand for more traction on the tracks.

“It’s easy to operate, but they can be temperamental,” Barnett said of these coal-fired beasts.

Going forward, Barnett can watch the tracks ahead through a small window. Or in forward or reverse, he can poke his head out the side opening, much like a happy dog hanging out the window of his master’s car.

Also on board was Fireman Gil Williams of Lexington, S.C., and Mike Stovall of Greensboro, a fireman in training. All three men are regular transportation museum volunteers who love anything to do with trains and their operation.

READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE WITH LOTS OF GREAT PICTURES!

Stay Connected!
images twitter_logo youtube

Bookmark and Share

Advertisements

The posts I’ve written about the late Daniel Boone Railroad in Hillsborough are some of the most viewed on the site.

Recently, I received an email from a guy we’ll call “Camo” who has fond memories of riding the train, as I do. He has volunteered to take some new pictures of the area, as well as share some of his old pictures of the RR.

I asked, and soon we’ll have a special guest blog post coming soon from our friend, “Camo.”

Here’s a teaser photo for you. Camo in Hillsborough, in front of old Daniel himself.

Check back soon. More to come…

Stay Connected!
images twitter_logo youtube

Bookmark and Share

triad live steamersPiedmont Farmers’ Market, Inc. is a 501-(3)C non-profit corporation owned and operated by a Board of Directors that is nominated from the slate of market members to serve 3 year terms. The market was created to serve the community by providing locally grown, fresh, high-quality produce and products, and to provide an economic outlet for local farmers, producers, and artisans in Cabarrus and surrounding counties of North Carolina’s piedmont. Come meet the grower!

Visit: http://www.piedmont-farmersmarket.com

Triad Live Steamers Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving the lore and history of railroading with large scale model trains. The railroad and its equipment is for both children and adults alike to enjoy and ride on. You do not have to own any equipment in order to come and enjoy the club or to join.

Visit: http://www.triadlivesteamers.com or check out some pictures from their Boiler Day on Flickr!

Stay Connected!
images twitter_logo youtube

Bookmark and Share

Good news: It was a normal day in  Sharon Springs , KS when a Union Pacific crew boarded a loaded coal train for the long trek to Salina.
 
The Bad news: Just a few miles into the trip a wheel bearing became overheated and melted, letting a metal support drop down and grind on the rail, creating white hot molten metal droppings spewing down to the rail.
 
The Good news: A very alert crew noticed smoke about halfway back in the train and immediately stopped the train in compliance with the rules.
 
The Bad news: The train stopped with the hot wheel over a wooden bridge with creosote ties and trusses.
 
The crew tried to explain to higher-ups but were instructed not to move the train! They were instructed Rules prohibit moving the train when a part is defective!

But….rules are rules!

 
Stay Connected!
images  twitter_logo  youtube 
Bookmark and Share

The following are books on railroading and Western America by Lucius Beebe or Lucius Beebe and his partner. Charles Clegg.

1. High Iron: A Book of Trains. (New York: D. Appleton-Century Company, 1938).
2. Highliners: A Railroad Album (New York: Bonanza Books, 1940).
3. Trains in Transition (New York: Bonanza Books, 1941).
4. Highball: A Pageant of Trains ( New York: Bonanza Books, 1945)
5. The Narrow Gauge Railroads of Colorado (Railway & Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin
No. 671, August 1946).
6. Mixed Train Daily: A Book of Short-Line Railroads. (Berkeley, CA: Howell-North, 1947).
7. Virginia City & Truckee: A Story of Virginia City and Comstock Times (Oakland, CA:
Grahame H. Hardy, 1949).
8. U.S. West: The Saga of Wells Fargo (New York: Dutton, 1949).
9. Legends of the Comstock Lode (Oakland, CA: Grahame H. Hardy,1950).
10. Cable Car Carnival (Oakland, CA: Grahame H. Hardy,1951).
11. Hear the Train Blow: A Pictorial Epic of America in the Railroad Age (New York: Dutton,
1952)
12. Comstock Commotion: The Story of the Territorial Enterprise and Virginia City News
(New York: Dutton, 1954).

READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE

 
Stay Connected!
images  twitter_logo  youtube 
Bookmark and Share

Source: SalisburyPost.com

By Hugh Fisher

hfisher@salisburypost.com

SPENCER — Roy Johnson, president of the N.C. Transportation Museum Foundation, is looking ahead to a bright new year.

Under his leadership, the organization is making changes to protect itself, and is thriving despite a down economy.

“We’re trying to tell the full story of how transportation developed North Carolina,” he said.

The N.C. Transportation Museum Foundation provides fundraising and political advocacy for the 57-acre museum.

In particular, the foundation has helped acquire millions of dollars in historic artifacts for the museum.

Johnson, a Charlotte-based architect, has been president of the foundation since June.

Under his tenure, the museum has weathered continued fiscal belt-tightening by the state of North Carolina, and has seen visitors to the Spencer museum it supports increase by 15 percent.

READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE

 
Stay Connected!
images  twitter_logo  youtube 
Bookmark and Share

New technology allows the train’s engine to capture the energy it now wastes, store it in a battery and use it for acceleration.

Click on the image below to watch the video. You’ll have to sit through a 15-second ad, but it’s very interesting.

 
Stay Connected!
images  twitter_logo  youtube 
Bookmark and Share